About Pointing Fighting Cocks

Pointing fighting cocks

After the conditioning period comes pointing fighting cocks and this is an equally important stage in preparing your gamecocks for a fight. There are many approaches to pointing and cockers have their own strategies on how to do it. Some are open about their methods and share what they know to others but there are also those who prefer to keep it a secret so as to keep their advantage especially against those who are less of an expert in this science of pointing a rooster for a fight.

Yes, pointing fighting cocks is a science

It is a science in the sense that you must be accurate in determining when is the peak of the gamecock that you are pointing. A miscalculation of the time when the battlecock reaches its peak form can spell the difference between winning and losing the fight. If the game chicken is not in its peak fighting form, you run the risk of losing and many times this has been pointed out by experts in cockfighting.

It is an art

Pointing fighting cocks is also considered as an art in many respects. This is because every handler has his own way of pointing and getting the rooster ready for a fight. One handler may claim that he has the best method while another can argue that his method is unbeatable. It is because of these diversities that make pointing a fighting cock an art. This is also the reason why there is no specific form of pointing that can be applied to all and be claimed as the only best way to do it.

There are conditioning experts who use old techniques in pointing especially those passed down from generation to generation by families of cockfighting aficionados. They keep it a secret and therefore not shared to other sabong enthusiasts. But there are also those who share how they do it although it is not really known how open they are in sharing the method for pointing.

The purpose of pointing fighting cocks

After being exposed to the rigors of conditioning, you have to give your fighting cock the rest to complete his build-up for the fight. If the 21 days of conditioning was meant to maximize agility, energy, strength and speed, there must be a time that you have to stop the conditioning to prevent burn-out. Pointing is precisely that – to prevent burn –out and to ensure that the fighting cock is in tip top condition come fight day. It is the stage where all the stress must be taken out of the picture and a time to allow the fighting cock to bulk up when needed or to lose weight if necessary.

Since the fighting cock just endured three weeks of conditioning, it is expected that they have bulked up and developed muscles. Pointing should be the time to adjust their nutrient intake in favor of carbohydrates to give them more energy. The gradual progression of conditioning from day one and adjustments going into the pointing stage are meant to ensure 100% readiness for the fight.

How many days to point a fighting cock

Most cockers agree that all you need is three days to complete the pointing process. But there are also those who believe that three days is too short and prefer a five-day pointing regimen. There is really no hard and fast rule when it comes to the length of pointing. The number of days will depend on several factors some of which are not within the dictates of the trainer. Some argue that there are particular gamecock bloodlines that can be pointed fast enough while there are also bloodlines or family of gamefowls that need longer time to reach the peak.

The main idea in pointing is to make sure that the fighting cock must reach 100% tip-top condition just one hour before the fight. There should be no sparring during the period of pointing because you want to avoid injuries and also to condition the rooster to anticipate the fight. It is understood that no battlecock can remain in tip-top shape for long so the pointing must be accurate and specifically designed to ensure that not only is the battlecock ready physically, but also mentally. The steam is already built-up so the rooster is expected to give all his best inside the pit. If the fight did not push through, the owner simply let the steam loose by sparring the rooster the next morning.

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